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Our book for June will be Of Woman Born by Adrienne Rich.

Our book for July will be What's Bred in the Bone by Robertson Davies.

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First off, please remember to vote in the June selection poll. Voting closes tomorrow at noon EST.

Anyway, I finished reading Guards! Guards! over the weekend, and I suspect I have a developed a mild case of Pratchett fatigue.

This is the fourth Discworld novel that I've read in the past month or so, the others being Soul Music, Witches Abroad, and Mort. Aside from these, I've also previously read The Color of Magic and Wyrd Sisters. I think that Pratchett's style is just wearing thin at this point. Which means my somewhat "meh" reaction to this book is less a reflection upon its quality and more an indication that I just need to be reading something different right now.

There were certainly plenty of funny bits--I think that even the subpar Pratchetts have many moments of brilliance, and as I've already said, I'm not inclined to think that this is a subpar one. SpoilersCollapse )

I'm also beginning to wonder if I'm just going to like the Watch books somewhat less than the Death books or the Granny Weatherwax books. The humor in Guards! Guards! struck me as particularly male at times. Did anyone else get this impression? I don't think this quality was off-putting so much as distancing. I'm even reluctant to say "distancing," because I've always liked to think I've had no problem relating to traditionally male narratives, but perhaps this is less true than I thought it was. Anyway, I do think this quality may have been one reason I wasn't particularly emotionally engaged by the characters or plot.

At any rate, I think I'll probably give the Discworld novels a nice long break before moving on to another one. That said, I don't think there's any doubt I'll come back to them eventually!
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Hello all,

Any suggestions for our June book? I'd love to read something that's new for as many people as possible. Is there something on your to-read list that you'd love an excuse to jump to? Let us know.

As usual, I'll take suggestions for a few days and put up the voting poll shortly.

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I was very pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed Persepolis.

I had read general descriptions about the book before starting it, but I wasn't prepared for it to be so much a family story. That is, I expected tales from her childhood, but I didn't expect them to be so closely framed by her interactions with her family and friends. In retrospect, this was sort of silly of me. Spoilers begin.Collapse )

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Our book for May will be Terry Pratchett's Guards! Guards!.
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Hello, your trusty flaky neighborhood mod is checking in. Does anyone have suggestions for our May book? Please leave them in the comments and I'll put up the usual poll.

I've been thinking about something upbeat or humorous--how about David Sedaris or Terry Pratchett?

My copy of Persepolis just came in at the library, so I hope to be posting on that sooner rather than later.

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Hey, so it looks like I'm the first one posting on this book... I have tons of work to do this week (and I was swamped with other activities this past weekend), but I had to return the book today, so I wanted to write a few quick thoughts before I forgot them...

Basically, I really liked Persepolis, it was kind of like "Maus-light" (and set in Iran). There were dark points, but not nearly as disturbing as "Maus" can get - though I can see why comparisons can be made between the two books.

Some vague, (spoilery) thoughtsCollapse )
Current Mood:
busy busy
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Hey all - I don't know if it's time yet to talk about "Castle of Crossed Destinies" by Italo Calvino (That's this month's book, right?)

Anyway, in order to get the discussion started, here are my thoughts:
My thoughts... for what they're worth... cut-tagged for length and possibly spoilersCollapse )

Current Mood:
sleepy sleepy
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Jumping in with a quick post on Tooth and Claw before we start on the next book.

Firstly, can I say how much I enjoyed this book. (This was a bit of a relief after last month when I loved the concept and hated the execution.) I thought that Tooth and Claw worked well on two levels, both of which were necessary. I loved the idea of taking a world where the implications are really worked out of "what if the world really worked the way that Victorian novels do?" But I also thought that within the story itself the characters and the plot worked in their own right. I suspect that if the book was only offering a gimmick about "Hey, look female dragons are really handicapped by their nature from doing things which male dragons do all the time!" then it would have got quite stale quite fast.

I also loved lots of little details and I would certainly like to know more about the world. (I believe that a sequel is in the works?) For example there was a brief mention of a "marriage market" which initially went completely over my head. Then I was ambushed by the realisation that in this world, a "marriage market" is probably not a metaphor. I'd love to see how it works, though I probably wouldn't enjoy being a part of it.

Cut for length, spoilers and disjointed thought patternsCollapse )
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